ASCAS Association of Small Collectors of Antique Silver ASSOCIATION OF SMALL COLLECTORS OF ANTIQUE SILVER
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by Robert Massart
 
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AN "EARLY GEORGIAN" SALT CELLAR

This is an Early Georgian (George II) (note 1) sterling silver open cauldron salt cellar or open master salt, made in London, England in 1746 by Edward Wood.
The round Rococo (note 2) style salt cellar is raised on three hoofed feet. The circumference is embellished with repousse work of roses and leaves. The salt is lacking its glass liner (inner gilding is absent) and a small hole is present in the center of a rose.
It measures 69 mm in diameter, stands 39 mm tall and weighs 52 grams.
The bottom is hallmarked with the lion passant guardant (note 3) for sterling silver, crowned leopardís head for the Guild mark of London and date letter " l " in old English showing that it was hallmarked in London 1746.
The salt cellar is engraved on the bottom with the initials D over G.M.
The makerís mark "EW with a crown above and a crescent below" (note 4) punched on the bottom is actually that of Edward Wood, (no relation to Samuel Wood).
He is registered as being a specialist salt cellar maker. A research made about him states "no one in London in the mid 18th century made more salt cellars" (from Grimwade, London Goldsmiths 1697-1837: Their marks and Lives, page 709). This mark was entered in 1740 while an earlier mark was entered in 1722.
Samuel Wood was master to David Hennell and died 1752.

 
ENDNOTES
(1) George II (10 November 1683-25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-LŁneburg and Arch treasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. He was the last British monarch born outside Great Britain, and was famous for his numerous conflicts with his father and, subsequently, with his son. As King, he exercised little control over policy in his early reign, the government instead being controlled by Great Britainís first de facto Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole. (from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
(2) The Rococo style (1695-1760) was characterized by the emphasis it gave to decoration (floral motifs, masks, shells).
(3) The walking lion looking to the left over his shoulder was used during the pre 1822 period
(4) A crown above the initials, though not compulsory, denotes a Royal silversmith.
Robert Massart
- 2008 -